Recruiting. Best Practices

Job Postings and Job Descriptions Are Different in Ways That Matter!

by Sara Bennett | November 16, 2020

0 Author-Jeanne, Blog, Hiring.Best Practices, INFO AND RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS, Recruiting. Best Practices get connected

There are important differences between a job posting and a job posting. Check out job posting best practices here! . … Read More »

Staffing Trends for Northwest Employers – 2020 Style!

by Sara Bennett | January 22, 2020

0 Author-Jeanne, Blog, Featured in Newsletter, INFO AND RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS, Recruiting. Best Practices get connected, main whats happening

The year ahead brings political and economic uncertainties while younger generations are entering the workforce - what does all this mean for staffing, recruiting, hiring and employee retention? … Read More »

How to Find (and Hire) Eagles When You’re Bombarded by Turkeys

by Sara Bennett | April 16, 2019

0 Author-Sara, Blog, Call Center Staffing, Finance/Accounting Roles, Healthcare Staffing, Hiring.Best Practices, INFO AND RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS, Recruiting. Best Practices get connected, on the move

Check out this HIRING GUIDE that will help you find and hire great employees each and every time - a step by step approach to the right hiring decisions! … Read More »

A New College Grad Can be a Smart Hiring Decision

by Marketing Team | July 5, 2018

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With the 2018 college grads about to hit the market, now is a good time to relook at this segment of the marketplace with fresh eyes. … Read More »

Great Job Postings in the Age of “Googlization”

by Guest Author | April 4, 2018

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In a tight labor market, writing job postings that actually attract the talent you need requires some finesse and digital savvy. Here's some basics that are important to success! … Read More »

Hiring Great Employees – Even in a Tight Candidate Market!

by Jeanne Knutzen | March 1, 2018

0 Blog, Hiring.Best Practices, INFO AND RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS, Recruiting. Best Practices, Temporary Staffing.Best Practices get connected

Finding great employees is not easy in any market, but in today's job market, particularly in the Northwest, the challenge is doubly difficult. Here's how to compete....  … Read More »

Alexa – Who Should I Hire?

by Jeanne Knutzen | November 14, 2017

0 Blog, Hiring.Best Practices, INFO AND RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS, Recruiting. Best Practices, Temporary Staffing.Best Practices get connected

The homework needed to create a recruiting profile involves many layers of exploration. And the stakes are high. Creating the right profile is key to a successful hiring outcome. … Read More »

What is “Cultural Fit”? Why Does It Matter?  

by Jeanne Knutzen | November 1, 2017

0 Blog, Hiring.Best Practices, INFO AND RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS, Recruiting. Best Practices, Temporary Staffing.Best Practices get connected

Hiring based on the right "culture fit" benefits both companies and their employees and can dramatically impact team performance, morale and retention. Here's how and why... … Read More »

* Hiring is Taking Longer than Ever. How Do Successful Managers Deal with That Reality?

by Jeanne Knutzen | May 5, 2016

0 Blog, Healthcare!, Hiring.Best Practices, INFO AND RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS, LOCAL NEWS AND TRENDS - EMPLOYMENT, STAFFING, Recruiting. Best Practices, Temporary Staffing.Best Practices

Question: I have always been willing to spend whatever time it takes to hire right. How can I avoid the downside of that approach in this candidate short marketplace? … Read More »

When Does a Temp-to-hire Staffing Model Not Work?

by Jeanne Knutzen | March 16, 2016

0 Blog, Flexible Staffing Strategies, Hiring.Best Practices, INFO AND RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS, Recruiting. Best Practices, Temp-to-Hire. Best Practices

Question - PACE often suggests a “temp-to-hire” staffing model. When does that model NOT work? Answer – That is a great question. … Read More »

* Better Hires Take More Time!

by Jeanne Knutzen | July 7, 2015

0 Blog, Hiring.Best Practices, INFO AND RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS, Recruiting. Best Practices

As a leading provider of temporary, contract and direct hire candidates in the greater Seattle area, we regularly work with our customers to shorten the time between point of need and hiring date – an element in the hiring process that often impacts our client’s ability to capitalize on opportunities or drive unnecessary costs out of their staffing process. … Read More »

7 Signs It’s Time to Optimize Your Recruiting Function

by Jeanne Knutzen | February 24, 2015

0 Blog, INFO AND RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS, Recruiting. Best Practices, Temporary Staffing.Best Practices

The traditional role of the recruiter has expanded and evolved so drastically it can feel nearly impossible to keep up. With the latest tools, best practices, and an ever-growing list of new job requirements for talent acquisition specialists it requires a constant need to evaluate, assess, and optimize the recruiting process. Let's do a quick audit of the common signs of a broken recruiting function. … Read More »

How to Hire for Cultural Fit During the Holidays

by Jeanne Knutzen | February 12, 2015

0 Blog, INFO AND RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS, Recruiting. Best Practices Temp Agencies in Tacoma WA, Temp Agencies in Tacoma Washington, Temp Agencies Tacoma, Temp Agencies Tacoma WA, Temp Agencies Washington

Attitude matters more than aptitude. In other words, cultural fit can be a strong determinant of candidate success, sometimes even stronger than skill sets or experience. So it’s a good idea to hire candidates who fit in, not just candidates who can do the job. … Read More »

How to “Do” Employee Engagement – Not Just Talk About It!

by Jeanne Knutzen | September 2, 2014

0 Blog, Recruiting. Best Practices Employee Appreciation, Employee Engagement, Employee Leadership, Employee Motivation, Fierce Inc., Halley Bock, Leadership

The following article was written by our good friend and professional colleague, Halley Bock, CEO of Fierce Inc. Fierce is a world class leadership training and development company headquartered in Pioneer Square, Seattle, Washington, but with clients working with Fierce leadership concepts all over the globe.  This particular piece appeared in a recent Fierce newsletter, but was originally posted on TrainingMagazine.com. We thought our readers and other friends of PSN would benefit from reading about simple, hands on ways to engage employees in meaningful ways. Marbles Thanks to Gallup’s annual State of the American Workplace survey, we know that employee engagement statistics continue to fall short of expectations and what we know is possible for our companies and ourselves. The short and sweet of it is that only 30 percent of the U.S. workforce is engaged, with the actively disengaged costing our economy somewhere in the range of $450 billion to $500 billion per year. That’s a lot of dough to leave on the table and certainly nothing to pride ourselves on. And while so many managers are aware of this issue—we know we need our employees engaged and we can discuss this topic at great length—we don’t necessarily know how to do employee engagement. It remains a statistic we strive for: intangible, elusive, and ever increasing in importance. When it comes to employee engagement, three key trends have surfaced as the most critical for increasing and maintaining high levels of engagement: Candor, Collaboration, and Development. Big topics, yes. But when broken down, we begin to see how we can get our hands on the levers and actually do engagement. Candor According to a study conducted by Harvard Business Review, companies rated by their employees as being in the top quartile in openness of communication delivered an average total shareholder return of 7.9 percent over a recent 10-year period, compared with 2.1 percent at companies in other quartiles. According to another study by Corporate Executive Board, the key indicator most strongly correlated with 10-year returns is employees’ comfort in speaking up, even when they have negative things to say. Clearly, candor is important and explains why companies with higher engagement create more profit. Here’s how to do candor: Tell the truth, always. Corporate America continues to squander employee trust, be it through the housing crisis and subsequent collapse of the economy, or the recently revealed GM safety issues and subsequent recall. Little by little, lie after lie and deceit after deceit gets revealed to scores of innocent employees who unknowingly participated in massive schemes rooted in corruption, greed, and mendacity. The devastation to our livelihoods and trust is immense. The only viable way for organizations to regain trust is simple: Tell the truth and keep telling the truth. No. Matter. What. Avoid making excuses for employees, believing they are unable to handle the truth because the truth is, they can handle it. What they can’t handle are the lies and the “massaged” truths. By speaking the truth in a skillful way, employees can rise to the challenge and actively engage themselves in the solution. Ask for the truth, frequently. Candor is a two-way street—an unending feedback loop—that should be traveled often. As much as we deliver candid feedback (both positive and critical), ask for the same in return. No matter what a person’s title, we all have blind spots and could use a refreshing, outside perspective on what we’re doing well and what we could improve. Collaboration In our own survey, The Six Key Trends That Increase Employee Productivity and Engagement, 98 percent of respondents believe exploring other points of view improves decisions. Gallup found that engagement increases at all levels of tenure as employees continue to participate in focused initiatives to improve their engagement. Imagine that: engaging employees in their own engagement through collaborative means. Here are some ideas on how to do collaboration in a way that directly feeds into increasing engagement: Work the lattice, drop the ladder. The ongoing resilience and health of any organism, animate or inanimate, depends largely on its ability to withstand change. Structures that are able to weather these storms are typically well footed, with reinforcements that tie in both vertically and horizontally. Why we believe higher safety, stability, and success exist through creating siloed organizations remains a great mystery to me. Decisions made within a vacuum are dangerous as they are less informed and, therefore, run a higher risk of failure. When making decisions that affect a strategy, customers, and/or employees, take the time to seek multiple, diverse perspectives. Reach across the lattice of the entire organization, pull in insights that will create a better outcome, and strengthen engagement across the board. Create an engagement committee. As per Gallup’s own statistic, employees appreciate having a hand in creating and sustaining their own engagement. This explains why many firms with coveted top engagement levels have teams or committees focused solely on this initiative, or on being a “best place to work.” A company’s engagement culture is not something that can be managed from the top down. Culture is an outcome that results from the quality of relationships employees have with one another, with their company, and with their leaders. Because it is such a vast ocean and because engagement is created through different means for different people, it makes a heck of a lot of sense to create a cross-boundary committee to help guide this ship. By inviting employees in at the ground level we can increase engagement levels immediately. The upside only gets better from there. Development Individual development and the ability to make an impact on an organization is an increasingly hot topic for high potentials and Millennials. To pull another statistic from Gallup’s survey, Gen X and Baby Boomers are the least engaged, but Millennials are the most likely of all generations to leave their companies in the next 12 months if the job market improves. Why? Because they often feel road-blocked from reaching their full potential due to outdated development and promotion programs. These are typically programs that are blindly followed and have very little to do with the individual on the other end. Rather than do development on behalf of others, let’s involve employees so they can do development for themselves. Ask the questions, lose the assumptions. Another danger of living within the confines of a ladder, silo, or closed system is that we lose sight of all the possibilities and begin to view the world in a fairly one-dimensional way. We begin to assume that the only way to progress in a company is to go “up.” Or that it involves managing more people. Or that it means adding an “S” to the “VP” within a title. Or that it certainly must involve a merit increase. In short, we begin to make assumptions that may have a lot to do with our own values and experience but may have little or nothing to do with the individual sitting in front of us. Before envisioning a development path for employees and starting them down that journey, ask them how it is they see themselves growing within the organization. Put the onus on them to create a vision of their future and then develop a path that speaks to them. In essence, engage them in their own development right from the beginning. Challenge status quo. Gone are the days of applying one rule across multiple cases with the expectation that it will “hold water” for an extended time. The world, and thereby business, has become too dynamic and so have the generations of people we employ. To engage today’s workforce and meet their development needs, focus on individuals and their capabilities when assessing new opportunities. For example, revisit how quickly a high-performing employee potentially could make the jump from a junior to senior position. Does it really have to be after a two-year term or after having managed x number of projects or people? If employing a remote workforce is currently off-limits yet a top player requires this shift, lean into the possibility and seriously consider why this would not/could not work. Chances are, those fears are not based on reality and are tied to something else that needs to be challenged. Bottom line, when a top performer challenges your beliefs, rather than defend the policy or your stance, get curious with yourself and the employee. Genuine exploration into a juicy topic alongside any employee automatically will create engagement, and will do so no matter what the outcome. In summary, engagement requires engagement. There’s a lot of doing required—transforming this huge, amorphous topic into something tangible that we can act on. It won’t happen as a result of offering extravagant perks but comes through reinforcing each and every connection within an organization. Creating an intentional culture by focusing on candor, collaboration, and individualized development will put a company well on the path to achieving the statistics we all aspire to.