How Many Employees are Available to Hire NOW?

by Guest Author | April 11, 2016

0 Finance/Accounting Staffing, Flexible Staffing Strategies-Best Practices, Healthcare Staffing, Human Resources Staffing, IT Staffing, Resources for Employers, Hiring Managers, HR Professionals, Staffing News

How much do you know about the local talent marketplace? How many employees with the skills you need are available in the local marketplace? How many and what kind of employers are looking for the same kind of employees? Who is competing against you for the available talent? How much are your competitors paying for these employees? We suspect you’d like to know… … Read More »

Use Your Company Culture to Attract Talented Healthcare Employees

by Jeanne Knutzen | December 17, 2013

0 Healthcare Staffing Seattle Healthcare Staffing, Seattle Healthcare Staffing Agencies, Seattle Healthcare Staffing Agency, Seattle Healthcare Staffing Company, Seattle Healthcare Staffing Firm, Seattle Healthcare Staffing Firms, Seattle WA Healthcare Staffing

If you’re a staffing manager or an administrator for a successful healthcare facility, then you already understand the value of selective hiring, strong retention efforts, fair compensation, and worker friendly company policies. You know how to earn the respect of your staff by placing patient care and employee needs at the top of your long list of corporate priorities. But how much do you invest in workplace branding? The best way to manage and retain great employees is to attract great employees in the first place. And sometimes the best way to attract great employees is to leverage the ones you already have. Keep your teams happy and thriving, and they’ll become excellent ambassadors and terrific recruiters. Here are a few ways to set the stage. 1. Keep an open door policy between your teams, their managers, and your HR department. Strong relationships based on open communication form the foundation of any healthy workplace culture. If your employees have complaints or suggestions, they should feel no sense of hesitation about speaking up. And when they need to clear the air or make a request, they should have easy access to all the proper channels. 2. Keep a close eye on bad apples. If you have individual staff members or managers on your teams who bring others down, recognize the signs and know when it’s time to step in. Coaching and clear performance management can keep toxic vibes from spreading. Walk chronically angry employees toward the door, and recognize the red flags that indicate bullying and harassment. 3. Take complaints and resource requests seriously, and act on them immediately. Don’t make your employees jump through hoops to gain access to the basic tools they need to do their jobs. And when something goes wrong and it’s brought to your attention, act. Don’t delay your decision hoping your employees will forget about the issue. 4. Show gratitude. Thank your employees loudly and often. Show appreciation verbally every single day, and make sure your individual managers and team leaders do the same. 5. Spread the word. If you have a great culture that makes you proud, and your employees feel the same way, encourage them to share this fact. Reward employees for posting positive comments about the company on social media. And when you have an open position to fill, ask your current teams to solicit applications from their friends, family and personal networks. Provide generous bonuses for successful referrals. For more on how to make your employees happy, and then leverage that happiness into a magnet for talented applicants, reach out to the Seattle healthcare staffing pros at Pace.

Medical Jobs in Demand at the End of 2013

by Jeanne Knutzen | November 19, 2013

0 Healthcare Staffing healthcare jobs in seattle, healthcare jobs in seattle wa, healthcare jobs in seattle washington, healthcare jobs seattle, healthcare jobs seattle wa

Attention recent graduates, up-and-coming 2014 graduates, and those who are just at the beginning of few long years immersed in an academic program. Here’s some news that may help you lay out your plans and plot the course that lies ahead: medical jobs are in demand right now. And some are more in demand than others. While the world will always need physicians, RNs, and surgeons, the healthcare employment field is incredibly diverse, and the positions below are experiencing regional shortages and peak demand as 2013 comes to a close. This can mean higher salaries and more leverage at the negotiating table for job seekers in these fields, and it can also mean a wider range of job options for those who are trained in these areas. Healthcare IT Experts This isn’t a clinical field, of course, but healthcare facilities need IT experts, and demand is expected to stay strong for several years to come. Along with network implementation and medical records management, health information security is a hot button concern right now. If you have the skills to help employers and medical facilities deal with their current IT challenges, you’re in luck. Clinical Support Physicians assistants and LPNs are greatly needed in underserved areas of the country, and even in heavily populated areas, healthcare facilities are becoming increasingly diverse. Patients once had two basic options when they needed care—a hospital or a private clinic. Now facilities are available that specialize in all forms of inpatient and outpatient treatment, and residential facilities are on the rise. All of these care providers will need every level of support staff in the years ahead. Pharmacists Pharmacists, pharmacy support teams, and pharmaceutical researchers all form vital links in a growing and essential part of the chain of healthcare delivery. Depending on certifications and levels of experience, both the opportunities and the salaries available to pharmaceutical experts will rise steadily over the next decade. RNs Registered nurses are in high demand almost all the time, in almost every region of the country. But highly experienced nurses with specializations in oncology, cardiology, maternity and pediatrics, anesthesiology, surgery, public education and patient outreach are experiencing growing leverage with employers as facilities expand and specialize. For more on how to enter into the fields above, which certifications to pursue, and which training programs to add to your resume, reach out to the Seattle healthcare staffing experts at Pace.  If you are looking for healthcare jobs in Seattle, contact us today.

Step into a Position in Healthcare Administration

by Jeanne Knutzen | October 16, 2013

0 Healthcare Staffing healthcare jobs in seattle wa, healthcare jobs seattle, healthcare jobs seattle wa, jobs in seattle, Jobs In Seattle WA, jobs seattle wa

A promising career in healthcare administration starts with an undergraduate degree (and ideally a graduate degree as well) in business, finance, healthcare administration, or healthcare policy. Some administrators begin with a degree in the life sciences, or even a full initial career in a clinical healthcare setting. But when it’s time to make the transition, most career shifters need to return to the classroom to gain the administrative and management background that employers usually require. But what comes next? When you’re ready to step onto the job market with your diploma in hand, how can you give yourself every available advantage in a competitive marketplace? Networking is Essential Start by growing your network. In fact, it’s a good idea to start building your network long before you complete your course work and exams. Join professional societies and local networking groups, and spend some time and effort reaching out beyond the boundaries of the healthcare industry. The more connections you maintain and the more you circulate actively among those who hold second and third degree connections that can help you, the faster you’ll reach your destination. And remember: what you can do for others is always more important than what they can do for you. Think in terms of offering and providing instead of requesting and demanding. Licensing and Professional Memberships After you acquire your state license, improve your marketability by applying for professional membership in any of the following societies: the American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM), the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), “a resource leader for healthcare administration management and medical practice managers”, and the Association for Healthcare Administrative Professionals (AHCAP), an “organization for administrative professionals who support our nation’s healthcare leaders.” Your specific career goals will determine which professional societies are right for you, but it’s a good idea to conduct some research and make contact with the branches in your area. In the meantime, determine the skills and specific areas of expertise your target employers are searching for and be ready to work your way into the field from the ground up. Reach out to the healthcare staffing experts at Pace for more information. If you are looking for healthcare administration jobs in Seattle WA, contact Pace today.

Why Pursue a Career In Healthcare Management?

by Jeanne Knutzen | September 10, 2013

0 Healthcare Staffing medical staffing seattle, Seattle Staffing Agency, Seattle Temp Agencies, Seattle Temporary Staffing, Staffing In Seattle WA

If you’re on the verge of choosing a college major or making a mid-life career transition, consider adding healthcare management to the options on your list. Healthcare management/ healthcare administration offers a promising path for those who are passionate about some but not all aspects of healthcare, and who have a natural talent for business. A flash of social savvy, the ability to think critically, and strong analytical skills can also help in this field. Generally, healthcare management is an ideal place for those who like the challenges of administration and enjoy helping people overcome medical challenges, but who prefer to work in an office rather than a clinical setting. Does this describe you? If so, you may enjoy the challenges and rewards of managing a hospital, private medical practice, residential facility, or care clinic. Here are a few other reasons this profession might be the right one for you. 1. Opportunity The healthcare field is growing fast, and hiring is on the rise in every area of the country. To accommodate the healthcare needs of a wave of retiring baby boomers, clinics and private practices are opening everywhere, and these facilities need to hire and manage staff at a rapid and growing rate. If you have a degree in healthcare policy, healthcare administration, or business, the door to this field is wide open. 2. Earning Potential While healthcare managers may have educational debts to pay off immediately after graduation, salary potential in this field can be high, so these debts may not last for long. According to the Bureau of Labor statistics, salaries for entry level positions in this field may start at around 40,000, but they can grow quickly into the six figure range. Larger clinics and hospitals in urban areas can usually provide faster salary growth. 3. Career Flexibility Healthcare management skills are highly transferable from one employer to the next, and these skills can also support success in other fields as well. These skills involve staffing, coaching, motivating a team, and managing complex budgets and schedules. 4. Advancement Potential In healthcare management, when it comes to career growth, the sky is the limit. If you’re looking for ways to take on more responsibility, increase you salary, and expand your field of influence, this career offers a great place to start. At the very top, large hospital CEOs are some of the highest paid professionals in any field. To learn more about what it takes to launch your career in this demanding field, make an appointment with the Seattle staffing and career management experts at Pace.

Skills Needed for Healthcare Administration

by Jeanne Knutzen | August 7, 2013

0 Healthcare Staffing healthcare jobs in seattle, healthcare jobs in seattle wa, healthcare jobs seattle, healthcare jobs seattle wa, healthcare jobs seattle washington

Do you have what it takes to launch a fulfilling career in healthcare administration? In addition to a bachelor’s degree (minimum) in healthcare policy or business, healthcare administrators also need high levels of skill in a few general areas, including communication, critical thinking, social savvy, and analytical reasoning. By the time they’re ready to step into a leadership role in any healthcare facility (including hospital, private practice, or clinic), healthcare administrators should be able to competently handle the tasks below. The Challenges Faced by Healthcare Administrators 1. Defining leadership style. As a healthcare administrator, you’ll need to understand how your specific leadership style works and you’ll need to know how to use this style to overcome the issues your facility and teams will face on a daily basis. Years of careful research conducted by sociologists and management experts have led to the conclusion that leadership styles are distinct and recognizable. The better you understand your own, the better your teams will respond to your direction. 2. Understanding legal regulations. Healthcare administers aren’t lawyers or policy makers, but their facilities are bound by regulations that are complex and constantly evolving. Successful administrators know how to interpret the regulations of HIPPA, for example, or the Affordable Care Act, and they know how to keep their facilities compliant. 3. Communicating clearly and effectively. As an administrator, your words will have a powerful impact on a wide range of stakeholders, from employees to patients to shareholders to community leaders. You’ll need to speak and write well in order to get your messages across. 4. Continuing your own education. Strong healthcare administrators maintain an ongoing interest in education, and they’re always learning new things about healthcare policy, healthcare leadership, and advances in clinical care. The most successful healthcare administrators are those who search for new ways to use technology to the advantage of the facilities they manage. As a healthcare leader, you’ll need to stay tuned in to new technologies and their potential to improve patient outcomes and strengthen the financial footing of your organization. If you can keep your teams motivated, your facilities compliant, and your patient satisfaction levels high, then you’re certainly on track to managing a successful healthcare organization. For more on how to set meaningful goals for both your facility and your own career, reach out to the Seattle staffing experts at Pace.

Should You Become a Healthcare Administrator?

by Jeanne Knutzen | July 2, 2013

0 Healthcare Staffing A Career In Health Administration, healthcare administration jobs in seattle, healthcare administration jobs seattle, healthcare administration jobs seattle wa, Seattle Staffing, Seattle Staffing Agencies, Seattle Staffing Agency, Seattle Temporary Staffing, Seattle WA Staffing, Staffing In Seattle

Healthcare Administrators, also sometimes called Health Administrators or Healthcare Managers, form the backbone of functional healthcare facilities like hospitals, nursing homes, and urgent care clinics. While doctors, RNs, and medical practitioners handle the clinical needs of patients and clients, healthcare administrators oversee the entire clinic and handle the hiring and scheduling of these practitioners. Administrators also manage the operational needs of the facility including vendor contracts, supplies, and budgeting. This is a position of high responsibility and high reward, and the outlook for this role is very promising. Healthcare administrators are in high demand right now, and this demand is expected to grow substantially over the next ten years. Should you pursue a career in this field? Here are few considerations that can help you decide.

  • The pay. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, healthcare administrators can expect to make an average of about 45,000 dollars at the entry level, and more experienced administrators can earn salaries between 50,000 and 110,000 per year. This rate varies slightly by geographic area.
  • The available opportunities. Healthcare administrators can pursue management positions in both large and small facilities in both the public and private sector. As a wave of baby boomers approach retirement age, the healthcare industry is expected to expand rapidly, and a parallel trend is occurring as facilities become increasingly specialized. Where people used to face only two choices when they needed treatment—hospitals and private clinics—they can now choose between a wide range of options from urgent care clinics to physical therapy centers.
  • The path. Those who choose to enter this field usually start by earning a four year degree in health administration, public policy, or business management. Some administrators then go on to obtain a Master’s degree, while others launch their careers with state or federal healthcare agencies working to shape the laws that impact public health.
  • The qualities necessary for success. Healthcare administrators who tend to thrive in this field usually possess qualities like a strong work ethic, organizational skills, and high levels of emotional and social energy. They often have excellent business sense and planning skill. Many of them enjoy the personal sense of reward that comes from helping those in need, and this role provides that reward without involving the hands-on clinical side of the healthcare industry.
If a future in healthcare administration seems like a match for your skills and interests; reach out to the Seattle healthcare staffing experts at Pace.

What Our Clients Need to Know About the Affordable Care Act

by Jeanne Knutzen | June 28, 2013

0 Affordable Healthcare – ACA Smart, Healthcare Staffing, Staffing News Affordable Care Act, Affordable Healthcare – ACA Smart, American Staffing Association, ASA, Benefits, Healthcare, Seattle Staffing, Seattle Temporary Staffing, Temporary Staffing

What two years ago seemed like an event too far off to care about, the launch of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) this coming January 1st is now just around the corner. While there are still significant gaps in the clarity needed to fully comply with the 2700+ page law,  we now know that most of the regulations that are going to be activated in January have been written. It’s now time for employers to make decisions about how they will comply with the key provisions of the Affordable Care Act. Because we are still hearing our client’s asking questions about the basic components of the law, we wanted to share information provided to us by our national trade association, the ASA (American Staffing Association), which we think does a good job of outlining the key elements of the ACA and what it means to our clients. Since the staffing industry is significantly impacted by ACA mandates, our industry worked closely with the DHSS throughout the writing of the ACA regs. Key ACA Definitions 1. (Eligible) Full Time Employee: Any employee who averages at least 30 hours per week (130 hours per month; 1560 hours per year). 2. Seasonal Employees: Employees working less than 120 days in a year. Generally excluded from ACA coverage because not considered full time. 3. Healthcare Plan—Minimum Essential Coverage (MEC): References the requirement that a compliant healthcare plan after January 1st must cover healthcare basics, “the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease.” Many of the so called “mini med”, wellness, and preventative plans will not meet the MEC requirement. 4. Healthcare Plan—Minimum Value: References the requirement that a compliant healthcare plan cover at least 60% of the overall costs associated with 1) physician and mid-level practitioner services, 2) hospital and emergency care, 3) pharmacy costs, and 4) laboratory/ imaging services. Many high deductible plans will not meet Minimum Value requirements.

  • The IRS and DHSS are developing a Minimum Value Calculator and a safe harbor checklist that employers can use to see if their plan meets the Minimum Value test.
6. Affordability: Refers to the ACA requirement that the employee’s share of the costs associated with single-only plan can be no more than 9.5% of the employee’s income. 7. Play: Refers to the decision an employer might make to offer a healthcare plan that provides Minimum Essential Coverage to 95% of its full time employees and their dependent children under age 26 (NOTE: It is not mandated that spouses be offered the plan). Even employers who “play” may be subject to penalties if 1) their plan is not affordable, 2) they fail to offer the mandated coverage to at least 95% of their eligible employees, or 3) if they do not offer coverage that meets the Minimum Value test. 8. Pay: Refers to the decision an employer might make to not offer the Minimum Essential Coverage, making them subject to “failure to offer” penalties. 9. Administrative Period: Refers to the first 90 days of a new hire’s employment within which their employer is required to offer an eligible full time employee the mandated benefits. 10. Exchanges: The mechanism through which insurers will offer small employers (less than 100 employees) and individuals the ability to purchase health insurance. If a state doesn’t provide an exchange, the federal government is required to do so—Washington, Oregon and California have created exchanges. 11. Subsidies: The credits available to individuals who qualify for assistance in order to purchase coverage through an Exchange. The subsidy assists the individual but is provided directly to carriers Key ACA Requirements 1. Employer Requirements: Employers with 50 or more full time employees (and full time equivalents) must offer a healthcare insurance plan that provides minimum essential coverage (MEC) to 95% of their full time employees and their dependent children (the play option) or be subject to penalties (the pay option). 2. Employer Penalties:  Employers are subject to penalties whether they pay or play. The amount of the penalties varies: 3. Penalties for Employers who Play—“Inadequate Plan” Penalties:  If the plan offered is “unaffordable” or does not provide “minimum value” the penalty is $250/month (up to $3K annually) per impacted employee who seeks and is granted a government subsidy. 4. Penalties for Employers who Pay—“Failure to Offer” Penalties:  If the employer does not offer a MEC plan to 95% of their full time employees and their dependent children, the monthly tax is $167 (up to $2k annually) on ALL full time employees (minus their first 30). NOTE: Pay Penalties apply to all employees, not just the employees not covered and are not tax deductible. 5. Individual Requirements: Individuals must enroll in a healthcare plan that provides them and their dependents minimum essential coverage or pay penalties. If they do not obtain insurance through their employer or Medicaid, they are required to purchase an individual plan that will be offered to them through Exchanges. 6. Individual Penalties: The penalty for failing to have insurance is either a flat dollar amount per person or a percentage of household income.
  • 2014: $95 per person (up to 3 or $285) or 1% of household taxable income
  • 2015: $325 per person (up to 3 or $975) or 2% of household taxable income
  • 2016: $695 per person (up to 3 $2085) or 2.5% of household taxable income
  • 2017 and beyond – same as 2016 with Cost of Living increases
7. Individual’s Eligibility for Subsidies:  Individuals with household incomes determined to be 100-400% of federal poverty levels may be eligible for government funded subsidies that they can use to buy insurance through public health exchanges.  NOTE:  Employees are not eligible for coverage if they are on Medicaid or have been offered a healthcare plan that is both affordable and meets Minimum Essential Coverage by their employer and refused it. 8. State and Federal Public Health Insurance Exchanges
  • Provide a place for individuals or small employers to purchase of compliant healthcare insurance. Available plans will be categorized into one of four groupings: Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum, plus a catastrophic plan.
  • Determine an employer’s or individual’s eligibility to purchase through the Exchange.
  • Determine the affordability of a plan offered to an individual through their employer.
  • Determine an individual’s eligibility for exemptions or subsidies.
9. New Discrimination Mandates
  • The regulations relating to the new discrimination provisions embedded in the ACA are not yet written and likely won’t be before 2015.
  • 2014 will allow differentiation in the plans offered to different employees and will allow different levels of employer contributions to those plans. Tiered/pay up plans are allowable in 2014.
  • Discriminations in favor of lower paid employees will remain permissible after 2014. Any employer can pay more for their lower paid employees to ensure what they offer meets “affordability” standards.
The ACA and Staffing - Unique Applications  1. Variable Hour Employees: Refers to employees working in a job where the length of employment or the hours of work each week is uncertain. The Variable Hour employee definition is assumed to apply to the majority of temporary or contract workers represented by the staffing industry who work on 1) an undetermined number of “short term” assignments, 2)  with a variety of clients, and 3) likely to be gaps between assignments.
  • Estimates are that only 10% of the current temporary and contract workforce will be benefit eligible.
  • The ASA is advising its members that assignments targeted to last less than six months will not be challenged if classified as “variable.” Assignments intended to last longer than six months are subject to “common sense” interpretations of the requirement of “uncertainty.”
2. Specific Rules for Variable Hour Employees:
  • Measurement Periods and the Look Back Rule: A look back/measurement period is a time period (ranging from 3 to 12 months as selected by the employer) during which a variable hour employee is determined to meet the test of full time status. To become eligible for coverage, an employee must average at least 30 hours per week during the measurement period.
3. Stability Periods. Stability periods must include the same number of months as the elected measurement period but are counted on a go-forward point from date of benefit eligibility. Employees working full time during the look back period will be benefit eligible during the go-forward stability period as long as they stay employed. NOTE: Employee must be covered during their stability period even if their hours of work are reduced to part-time status. 4. Staffing Firm Costs to Play include:
  • The cost of an affordable plan for 95% of eligible employees.
  • Minus the costs that would otherwise be associated with employees who opt out because they have coverage elsewhere
  • Plus the cost of penalties for any employees that receives subsidies because the plan offered is not affordable.
5. Staffing Firm Costs to Pay include:
  • A nondeductible monthly tax assessment of $166.67/month on all eligible employees (over the first 30). Penalties would be applied to ALL employees, covered or not.
6. Impact of Increased Costs on Clients
  • Expect 1-5% increase in bill rate
7. The Staffing Industry Challenge – “There are not a lot of Health Plans Designed for Temporary Workers“
  • Mini med plans no longer allowed. Fixed dollar indemnity plans—do not qualify as providing “minimum value;” preventive and wellness plans—won’t provide “Minimal Essential Coverage.”
  • New plans are expected to be developed between now and January 1st but with unknown costs and coverage.
The American Staffing Association and the ACA The American Staffing Association played an active role in writing ACA regulations. The ASA supports compliance with the law and urges its members not to participate in practices that violate either the substantive components of the law or its intent. The ASA strongly urges its members to avoid any arrangements with clients aimed at avoiding coverage or penalties. Activities the ASA believes will trigger an IRS audit include: 1) splitting hours of work between two entities when the employee is doing one job, 2) reducing employee headcounts below 50 for the purpose of avoiding ACA requirements, and 3) terminating, refusing to reassign, or limiting the hours of work for employees if the purpose is to deny coverage or penalties. Staffing can continue to be used for valid business reasons; fluctuating workloads, staffing special projects, managing turnover, auditioning processes, and legitimate part time work. For more information on the ACA and how it will impact your temporary workforce in 2014, contact us at infodesk@pacestaffing.com.

Get Ready for your Healthcare Video Interview

by Jeanne Knutzen | June 7, 2013

0 Healthcare Staffing healthcare jobs in seattle, healthcare jobs in seattle wa, Healthcare Staffing In Seattle, Seattle Staffing Agencies, Seattle Staffing Agency, Seattle Temporary Staffing, Staffing In Seattle, Staffing In Seattle WA, Video Healthcare Interviews

Video interviews are becoming a mainstream way for companies to streamline their hiring process. As the ease of video conferencing increases, healthcare employers are saving money and time by cutting back on in-person interviews, especially during the first round of the selection process. Simply asking a candidate for twenty minutes of online conversation reduces countless energy, cost and travel time for both the company and its applicants. But as it happens, online capability often means shorter notice when interviews are scheduled. While traditional interviews usually involve a few days of prep time, employers often schedule online meetings within 24 hours. So if you have only one day to prepare for your meeting, what can you do to make sure you’re ready? Try these steps.

1. First, make sure you have the right equipment. This includes a working, reliable webcam and all the necessary software you’ll need to establish a connection. Ask the employer if there are any specific programs you should have access to, like Google or Skype, and do all the downloading and installing you need to do right away.

2. Then set the stage. Make sure your backdrop is appropriate, clean, professional and not too cluttered. A simple blank wall will work fine. And pay attention to lighting. Arrange the lamps and natural light in the room to highlight your best features and factor in the time of day when the interview will be taking place.

3. Choose your outfit. A suit, nice blouse, or simple dress will usually do for an interview setting. Just make sure everything is clean and wrinkle free.

4. Plan for contingencies. Arrange child and pet care so you are not distracted. While you’re at it, make sure your neighbors, friends and family know not to stop by and ring the doorbell. Silence the ringer on your phone and anticipate any other potential distractions.

5. Focus on poise, just as you would during an in-person interview. Make sure you direct your attention toward the camera, not the screen. It may seem strange, but this will feel more like “eye contact” to your viewers, even if it doesn’t feel that way to you. Don’t make your interviewers talk to the side of your face or the top of your forehead.

When you’re finally ready for your moment in the spotlight, complete a dry run with a friend or family member to make sure everything is working as it should. Then use your final hours to conduct a little more research on the company and get some well-deserved sleep. Meanwhile, check in with the staffing experts at Pace for any questions about your healthcare job search.

A Day in the Life: Healthcare Administration

by Jeanne Knutzen | May 14, 2013

0 Healthcare Staffing A Career In Healthcare Administration, Entering Healthcare Administration, Healthcare Administrator, healthcare administrator jobs in Seattle, Healthcare Administrators, Healthcare Staffing In Seattle, Seattle Staffing, Seattle WA Staffing Agencies, Seattle WA Staffing Agency, Staffing In Seattle, Temporary Staffing In Seattle

While physicians, RNs, surgeons, and orderlies are darting around a busy hospital focused on caring for their patients, how do they know who’s responsible for what? Who takes care of the work schedules, management issues, orders, billing, financial matters and policy decisions that allow the hospital to function? Who handles the hiring, firing, budget allocations and business transactions that support the financial health of the clinic and the actual health of its patients? This responsibility falls to the healthcare administrator, a hardworking, well respected member of the industry. This person directs everything that takes place within the clinic or healthcare facility, and she usually holds a master’s degree and several years of experience in a management setting. This position is perfect for those who would like to play a key role in healthcare but aren’t necessarily looking for hands-on treatment responsibilities in clinical environments. If healthcare administration sounds like an ideal career for you, enter the field by making the following moves. Entering Healthcare Administration: Four Steps

1. Learn as much as you can about the field. For starters, it may be useful to know that this profession is in very high demand, and the number of available positions is expected to grow to about 100,000 by 2016. Inquire into your social network to find out who can connect you to an experienced healthcare administer (or administrators).  Once you have a list of names, set up informational interviews with these people to ask for guidance and advice.

2. Earn an undergraduate bachelor’s degree from a reputable, accredited university. Choose a major related to health policy, public health administration, business administration, biology, biochemistry, or any of the life sciences.

3. Pursue a graduate education. While some entry level healthcare admin fields don’t require more than a four year degree, most employers expect candidates to hold at least a master’s degree in public health administration or health policy. To gain access to a reputable graduate program, you’ll need to make sure your coursework, GRE scores, and recommendations are strong.

4. Survive graduate school without burning out. And while you’re working hard and gaining the support your need to pass your exams, make sure you’re also establishing a professional network. Earn the respect of your colleagues and professors, actively seek exposure to professional settings through part-time work and internships, and make contact with anyone in the field who may be able to help you when you’re ready to graduate and start looking for work.

When it’s time to step onto the job market, gather all the resources you need to hit the ground running. A professional staffing agency can be a great place to start. If you are looking for healthcare administrator jobs in Seattle, reach out to the employment experts at Pace for the connections, tools and job search tips you’ll need to get ahead.